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Brewday Thermometer Testing

Posted on: June 13, 2010

After my last two Imperial Stout Brewdays and peoples comments on efficiency and extraction, I thought I would test my thermometers.
Below are tests with a jug full of Ice & Water for the ZERO point and a pan of boiling water for the BOILING point.

The test subjects:
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The Cold Test

All submerged in Ice Water:
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My Cheap, from Hong Kong, regular brewday Thermometer in Ice Water reads 0.5c:
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The glass spirit thermometer reads -2c in Ice Water which I was quite surprised at:
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Another Cheap Hong Kong food thermometer reads 0.9c in Ice Water:
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My £15 ebay purchased Thermamite 5 reads 1c though it only reads in 1 degree increments:
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The Hot Test

The Thermamite 5 reads a 100c, which feels reassuring:
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Cheap Food thermometer reads 99c:
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My regular brewday thermometer reads 100c too:
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The spirit thermometer reads 100.5c:
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A fair range of inaccuracy but at least I know the ones I’ve been using are about the more reliable 🙂

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2 Responses to "Brewday Thermometer Testing"

I actually did a similar thing recently after getting some new spirit thermometers. The new thermometers were both the same, 0.5 out at freezing and boiling.

Old thermometer results :

Freezing: -2C (!)
Boiling: 104C (!!)
Also tested at Mash temp: All three the same! Phew 🙂

Its a good idea to know where your reference points are… I’ll be a tad more confident of my Mash temperatures from now on 🙂

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